Monday, September 17, 2012

Having Fun with Common Core: Pretty Colors

Since reading standards is such a drag, I’ve decided to present them in a slightly more palatable way—using pretty colors.

Key Ideas and Details #1
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
Ask and answer such questions to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.


Key Ideas and Details #2
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

There, that looks almost friendly. These are the first two CCSS for ELA in the Reading Informational Text category. Basically they say that after reading a nonfiction book, your kiddos should be able to identify the main topic and key details in of the text.

This certainly isn’t a new idea. In fact it’s pretty basic. What’s the point of reading if you don’t understand or remember the content? But as we know, this isn’t always easy for kids, especially beginning readers.

One great way to help students build their fluency and comprehension is Reading Buddies. You can find a great article about Reading Buddies here, but in a nutshell, the benefits for the younger child include:
—reading practice with real audience
—focus and try harder
—may get more kid-friendly explanations

And the benefits for the older child include:
—build self-esteem
—feel like making an important contribution

Both students:
—gain enthusiasm for reading
—develop cooperative learning behaviors

And the benefits for the school community include:
—friendships and understanding across grade levels
—may reduce bullying

But here’s my special twist on Reading Buddies. Instead of using books at the younger child’s reading level, use books with layered text. The simpler text is perfect for the young child, and the more complex text will challenge the older child. So both are learning. And after reading, they can discuss the art and content of the spread—a practice that will certainly address CCSS for ELA: Reading Informational Text #1 and #2.

My books A Place for Butterflies, A Place for Birds, A Place for Frogs, A Place for Fish, and A Place for Bats are perfect for this kind of Reading Buddies program. And I even have activities for the buddies to do after reading the books. I’ll talk more about them in a future post.

Here are some other books with layered text. They are also perfect for a Reading Buddies program in which both students participate.

Actual Size by Steve Jenkins
Beaks by Sneed B. Collard (illus. by Robin Brickman)
The Bumblebee Queen by April Pulley Sayre (illus Patricia J. Wynne)
A Butterfly is Patient by Diana Hutts Aston (illus. Sylvia Long)
An Egg is Quiet by Diana Hutts Aston (illus. Sylvia Long)
Meet the Howlers by April Pulley Sayre (illus. Woody Miller)
Move! by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page
A Seed is Sleepy by Diana Hutts Aston (illus. Sylvia Long)
What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page
When the Wolves Returned  by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent (photos Dan and Cassie Hartman)
Wings by Sneed B. Collard (illus. by Robin Brickman)

2 comments:

  1. What a useful series, Melissa. I hope teachers find you quickly! I'm sharing via Twitter, etc.

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  2. This is also helpful for parents who are hoping to improve reading fluency. Thanks for making such an attractive chart.

    ReplyDelete